Roger Federer

Roger Federer

*Roger Federer
(35 years old)

8 August 1981
Basel, Switzerland
6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)

Federer holds several records of the Open Era: holding the world no. 1 position for 302 weeks (including 237 consecutive weeks); winning 17 Grand Slam singles titles; reaching each Grand Slam final at least five times (an all-time record); and reaching the Wimbledon final ten times. He is among the seven men (and among the four in Open Era) to capture a career Grand Slam. Federer shares an Open Era record for most titles at Wimbledon with Pete Sampras and at the US Open with Jimmy Connors and Sampras.

Federer has reached 26 men's singles Grand Slam finals, including 10 in a row from the 2005 Wimbledon Championships to the 2007 US Open, both statistics being records. He also appeared in 18 of 19 finals from the 2005 Wimbledon through to the 2010 Australian Open. He reached the semifinals at 23 consecutive Grand Slam tournaments, from the 2004 Wimbledon Championshipsthrough the 2010 Australian Open.[20] At the 2015 Wimbledon Championships, he played in a record 63rd consecutive Grand Slam tournament, reached a record 45th Grand Slam quarterfinal, a record 37th Grand Slam semifinal and a record 26th Grand Slam final. Earlier at the 2013 French Open, Federer reached a record 36th consecutive Grand Slam quarterfinal. Federer has won the most matches in Grand Slams and is the first to record 65+ wins each at each Grand Slam tournament.

Federer's ATP tournament records include winning a record six ATP World Tour Finals, playing in the finals at all nine ATP Masters 1000 tournaments (a record shared with Djokovic and Nadal), and having won the most prize money of any player in history. He also won the Olympic gold medal in doubles with his compatriot Stan Wawrinka at the 2008 Summer Olympic Games and the Olympic silver medal in singles at the 2012 Summer Olympic Games. Representing Switzerland, he was a part of the 2014 winning Davis Cup team. He spent eight years (2003–2010) continuously in the top 2 in the year-end men's rankings and ten (2003–2012) in the top 3. He was named the Laureus World Sportsman of the Year for a record four consecutive years (2005–2008).